We already know that diabetes type 2 weakens our brain health and accelerates brain aging. But how strong is this influence compared to the normal brain aging?

A recent small study investigated whether cranberries due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could reduce age-related cognitive decline, ending up with dementia.

A recent study has found that compared to 2 children, having 3 or more of them has a negative effect on brain health later in life. Both for women and men. At least in Northern Europe.

Those who are interested in psychology, know the “Big Five” personality traits: agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, openness and extraversion. Researchers of a recent study were curious whether 3 of these personality traits (conscientiousness, neuroticism and extraversion) somehow are related to our brain functioning later in life.

According to a recent study, vitamin K might help reduce and even prevent age-related cognitive decline, leading to various forms of dementia.

This information comes from a recent large UK study. The study showed that while the number of people with memory problems had remained stable, the number of those with cognitive decline had more than doubled between 2009 and 2018.

Researchers of a recent study have found that niacin (also known as vitamin B3) slows down the progression of Alzheimers in a mouse model. Niacin seems to change microglia response to amyloid plaques.

It can. At least, according to a recent study. And this influence of antibiotics on the brain health is not really surprising. Previous studies have already shown that antibiotics’ use can lead to serious disruptions in the gut microbiome health. And, as we know, our gut has a strong connection with our brain.

A recent British study investigated brain changes in people aged between 51 and 81, caused by COVID-19.

The well-known and widely used drugs to treat anxiety and sleep disorders are benzodiazepines. They are effective and safe if used for a short period of time. However, their long-term use can not only cause dependence, but, particularly, in older people can lead to brain health issues.