According to a recent study, lifestyle seems to be more important than age in cognitive function and future dementia risks across all ages.

A recent international study has established a clear relationship between high-fat diet and worsening of cognitive abilities, including developing anxiety, depression and progression of Alzheimer’s disease.

A recent small study investigated whether cranberries due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties, could reduce age-related cognitive decline, ending up with dementia.

A recent study has found that compared to 2 children, having 3 or more of them has a negative effect on brain health later in life. Both for women and men. At least in Northern Europe.

According to a recent study, vitamin K might help reduce and even prevent age-related cognitive decline, leading to various forms of dementia.

This information comes from a recent large UK study. The study showed that while the number of people with memory problems had remained stable, the number of those with cognitive decline had more than doubled between 2009 and 2018.

It can. At least, according to a recent study. And this influence of antibiotics on the brain health is not really surprising. Previous studies have already shown that antibiotics’ use can lead to serious disruptions in the gut microbiome health. And, as we know, our gut has a strong connection with our brain.

According to a recent study, selenium (with the highest concentrations in Brazil nuts) could increase neuron generation, and boost learning and memory in aging brain.

According to a recent study, stability in body mass index (BMI) over time is linked to a slower cognitive decline in older people.

According to a recent small but long-term study, drinking 2 cups of coffee (2x240g) may make you less likely to develop Alzheimer’s.